Category: Gift Culture

Gift-Model Crowdfunding: Why I Love Patreon

Patreon is a relative newcomer in the crowdfunding arena. It’s only been around for three years, and less than a year in its current design incarnation. It’s growing rapidly, however, and for excellent reason. Unlike other crowdfunding platforms that operate on a strictly per-project basis, Patreon permits creators to fund their creative work on a

Success, Dependency, and Alienation: A Discussion

[Recently, on the Facebook page associated with this blog, a quote I posted from Charles Eisenstein spawned a fascinating and friendly discussion with two of my readers.  I thought it deserved a wider audience than it would get if I left it buried in a Facebook comment thread, so with the permission of the participants,

Why I Don’t Offer Personal Advice on Living Without a Job

Based on some recent patterns I’ve observed in my e-mail inbox, I think it’s time for a gentle reminder that while I sincerely appreciate hearing from my readers, I cannot answer all my mail.  I do try to respond to mail when I can, but there are certain kinds of mail I will always decline to

Your Attention is a Gift

I appreciate you, my dear readers. I mean that sincerely. There are countless other blogs out there that you could be reading right now, and a vast number of other things you could be doing with your time.  But you are reading this one. And for that, I want to thank you. I have high

Unjobbing is a Process

I often remind myself that unjobbing is a process, and not a destination. It’s not somewhere I end up.  It’s more like a meandering trail through a dense forest, with switchbacks, elevation changes, and occasional backtracking when I get lost.  Sometimes it leads into uncharted territory, and I find myself wondering what to do next. 

What is Radical Unjobbing?

“…a person who is radical is one who examines the roots of issues. And a radical solution to a problem is one that arises from that examination, addressing what we sometimes call the root cause, rather than the more superficial symptoms.” – Wendy Priesnitz, “On the Meaning of Radical”