Category: Lazy Bums Rhetoric

Note To Self: When You Fear You’re Not ‘Productive’ Enough

By D. JoAnne Swanson [Author’s note: this is the first in my “Note To Self” series of personal narratives, written from the perspective of a council of beings offering support, guidance, and self-care from within.] Dear Self: Whenever you start feeling shameful or critical of yourself because of your slow progress on your book manuscripts

On the ‘Lazy Bums Who Refuse To Work’ Rhetoric

For quite some time now I’ve had an essay in the works (“USA: Land of Suffering With a Smile”) about some of the ways that living and working in the USA resembles a normalized abusive relationship, writ large. The material for this essay has expanded as I write. It’s adapted from “Do What You Love,

“Get a Job!” by Justin Douglas

[Ed. Note: With the author’s permission, I’m re-publishing essays from his former site asobinomics.net, as they originally appeared in 2012. Here’s the second in the series!] “We don’t want full employment, we want full lives!” — slogan from the 1968 uprising in France I wrote previously about how our use of the phrase “incentive to work”

On The Leisure Track: Book Summary and Chapter Titles

Cultivating leisure. In a culture held in thrall to the  Protestant work ethic, the concept of consciously cultivating a culture of leisure sounds suspect to many people, and conjures up images of  frivolity and uselessness. One of the objections to unconditional basic income, for example, is the notion that too much leisure will lead to

Is Nothing Sacred? Thoughts on Leisure and ‘Doing Nothing’

What images and thoughts come to mind when you hear the word leisure? Many people automatically associate leisure with what people do in their ‘spare’ or ‘free’ time (i.e., time spent away from paid jobs), or with pursuits such as entertainment, vacations, or sports. I think we need to delve deeper when we think about

The Cult of the Job

I’d like to see us re-define success as having more to do with people and their values, and less to do with profits or climbing the corporate ladder. I’d like to see a world where we are less relentlessly driven by the pursuit of job growth, impressive stock portfolios, the “bottom line” and