Tag: colonized time

Note To Self: When You Fear You’re Not ‘Productive’ Enough

By D. JoAnne Swanson [Author’s note: this is the first in my “Note To Self” series of personal narratives, written from the perspective of a council of beings offering support, guidance, and self-care from within.] Dear Self: Whenever you start feeling shameful or critical of yourself because of your slow progress on your book manuscripts

‘Earning a Living’ and the Dilemma of Unpaid Work

“Earning a Living” and the Dilemma of Unpaid Work On the Injustice of a World Without Unconditional Basic Income by D. JoAnne Swanson [Author’s note: It is my custom to use quotes for the phrase “earning a living” to call attention to its moral injustice.] All of us have basic needs: food, clothing, shelter, rest,

The Real Four-Hour Workweek by Justin Douglas

[Ed. Note: With the author’s permission, I’m re-publishing essays from his former site asobinomics.net, as they originally appeared in 2012. Here’s the third and final one in the series!] Some years ago, I was at the bookstore and came across Tim Ferriss’ best-selling book, The Four-Hour Work Week: Escape 9–5, Live Anywhere, and Join the

On The Leisure Track: Book Summary and Chapter Titles

Cultivating leisure. In a culture held in thrall to the  Protestant work ethic, the concept of consciously cultivating a culture of leisure sounds suspect to many people, and conjures up images of  frivolity and uselessness. One of the objections to unconditional basic income, for example, is the notion that too much leisure will lead to

On Hypocrisy and Being a ‘Faker’

Over the years, many criticisms and insults have been directed at me as someone who writes openly about her principled opposition to the work ethic and the job culture. Among these is the puerile accusation that I’m a “faker” because I am looking for a job, and have been actively doing so for the past

I am a Radical Unjobber Because…

I am a radical unjobber because I believe people should have lives based on living, not on making a living. I am a radical unjobber because I believe that leisure is more than “free time”. I am a radical unjobber because I believe in an ecological ethic of service, interdependence, and care…not a “work ethic.”

The Cult of the Job

I’d like to see us re-define success as having more to do with people and their values, and less to do with profits or climbing the corporate ladder. I’d like to see a world where we are less relentlessly driven by the pursuit of job growth, impressive stock portfolios, the “bottom line” and