Tag: job culture

“Get a Job!” by Justin Douglas

[Ed. Note: With the author’s permission, I’m re-publishing essays from his former site asobinomics.net, as they originally appeared in 2012. Here’s the second in the series!] “We don’t want full employment, we want full lives!” — slogan from the 1968 uprising in France I wrote previously about how our use of the phrase “incentive to work”

The Incentive to Work by Justin Douglas

[Ed. Note: With the author’s permission, I’m re-publishing essays from his former site asobinomics.net, as they originally appeared in 2012. Here’s the first!] Lately I’ve been exploring the idea of a guaranteed basic income, also known as a citizen’s income or a negative income tax. Whatever the name, the principle remains the same: give every

Success, Dependency, and Alienation: A Discussion

[Recently, on the Facebook page associated with this blog, a quote I posted from Charles Eisenstein spawned a fascinating and friendly discussion with two of my readers.  I thought it deserved a wider audience than it would get if I left it buried in a Facebook comment thread, so with the permission of the participants,

On Hypocrisy and Being a ‘Faker’

Over the years, many criticisms and insults have been directed at me as someone who writes openly about her principled opposition to the work ethic and the job culture. Among these is the puerile accusation that I’m a “faker” because I am looking for a job, and have been actively doing so for the past

New blog title: Rethinking the Job Culture

If you’re a regular reader of this blog, you’ll note that it is no longer called Radical Unjobbing.  The URL will remain the same, as will the What is Radical Unjobbing? page.  But hereafter, I will refer to this blog by its new name: Rethinking the Job Culture.** The change came about after I spent

What is Radical Unjobbing?

“…a person who is radical is one who examines the roots of issues. And a radical solution to a problem is one that arises from that examination, addressing what we sometimes call the root cause, rather than the more superficial symptoms.” – Wendy Priesnitz, “On the Meaning of Radical”

The Cult of the Job

I’d like to see us re-define success as having more to do with people and their values, and less to do with profits or climbing the corporate ladder. I’d like to see a world where we are less relentlessly driven by the pursuit of job growth, impressive stock portfolios, the “bottom line” and