Tag: work ethic critiques

On the ‘Lazy Bums Who Refuse To Work’ Rhetoric

For quite some time now I’ve had an essay in the works (“USA: Land of Suffering With a Smile”) about some of the ways that living and working in the USA resembles a normalized abusive relationship, writ large. The material for this essay has expanded as I write. It’s adapted from “Do What You Love,

The Real Four-Hour Workweek by Justin Douglas

[Ed. Note: With the author’s permission, I’m re-publishing essays from his former site asobinomics.net, as they originally appeared in 2012. Here’s the third and final one in the series!] Some years ago, I was at the bookstore and came across Tim Ferriss’ best-selling book, The Four-Hour Work Week: Escape 9–5, Live Anywhere, and Join the

“Get a Job!” by Justin Douglas

[Ed. Note: With the author’s permission, I’m re-publishing essays from his former site asobinomics.net, as they originally appeared in 2012. Here’s the second in the series!] “We don’t want full employment, we want full lives!” — slogan from the 1968 uprising in France I wrote previously about how our use of the phrase “incentive to work”

The Incentive to Work by Justin Douglas

[Ed. Note: With the author’s permission, I’m re-publishing essays from his former site asobinomics.net, as they originally appeared in 2012. Here’s the first!] Lately I’ve been exploring the idea of a guaranteed basic income, also known as a citizen’s income or a negative income tax. Whatever the name, the principle remains the same: give every

On The Leisure Track: Book Summary and Chapter Titles

Cultivating leisure. In a culture held in thrall to the  Protestant work ethic, the concept of consciously cultivating a culture of leisure sounds suspect to many people, and conjures up images of  frivolity and uselessness. One of the objections to unconditional basic income, for example, is the notion that too much leisure will lead to

Success, Dependency, and Alienation: A Discussion

[Recently, on the Facebook page associated with this blog, a quote I posted from Charles Eisenstein spawned a fascinating and friendly discussion with two of my readers.  I thought it deserved a wider audience than it would get if I left it buried in a Facebook comment thread, so with the permission of the participants,

Is Nothing Sacred? Thoughts on Leisure and ‘Doing Nothing’

What images and thoughts come to mind when you hear the word leisure? Many people automatically associate leisure with what people do in their ‘spare’ or ‘free’ time (i.e., time spent away from paid jobs), or with pursuits such as entertainment, vacations, or sports. I think we need to delve deeper when we think about

I am a Radical Unjobber Because…

I am a radical unjobber because I believe people should have lives based on living, not on making a living. I am a radical unjobber because I believe that leisure is more than “free time”. I am a radical unjobber because I believe in an ecological ethic of service, interdependence, and care…not a “work ethic.”

What I Learned When I Quit My Job: Part One

[The following essay was originally published in 1999, as part of a short-lived monthly column in a webzine called Mr. Ridiculous, and it was later archived on whywork.org.  Except for the short bio at the end, this is the original, unedited version. Although I still like the basic approach of this essay – focusing on